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About Richard

Richard Jones is an exciting, young British violinist recognised for his innovative sound and approach and adaptability in bringing the violin to life within a broad range of musical contexts. 

Born in Wales and now based in London, his musical upbringing was a diverse tapestry of experiences that ignited his passion for music and provided opportunity to explore and develop. He went on to study music in Bath, where he also took time out from education to play with acclaimed British blues band ‘Kill It Kid’ who recorded their debut album in Seattle and toured internationally for a number of years. Eager though to expand his understanding and abilities in Jazz, he concluded his formal education in London at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama, where he studied their prestigious postgraduate Jazz program. 

Since completing his studies, Richard has immersed himself in the London jazz scene and has found a seat within a plethora of different bands encompassing a broad range of musical styles. It is this diversity of sound that Richard thrives on as a musician and his influences are ever evolving as he continues to play with new musicians and ensembles. Improvisation remains at the core of what he does and as a string player, Richard is always looking to push the boundaries of the instrument to new places. This has put him in regular demand as both a performer and studio musician, with recent involvement in projects lead by leading Jazz musicians including Christine Tobin, Mark Edwards, Robert Mitchel and Nicolas Meier. 

Whilst working in such a diverse and vibrant musical scene, Richard has written many of his own compositions which have already been brought to life within some of the projects that he is a part of – however, he plans to birth a new group and release a debut album under his own name in the coming months, so please keep in touch with what Richard is doing via his social media pages.

Spine-tingling
- The Guardian